Terrestrial Invasive Plant Control


Home
About A-Tip Control
Contact Information for A-Tip Control
Pond & Lake Services
Terrestrial & Wetland Services
Before & After Pictures
Online Store at A-Tip Control
Product Labels / MSDS
FAQs Frequently Asked Questions
A-Tip Control Affiliations


5681 Zerfass Road
Dansville, New York 14437

Phone: (585) 335-9299
Fax: (585) 335-9301

 

 

 

 

 

Terrestrial and Wetland Management
Terrestrial Weeds and Invasive Plants

Click on any name for description and additional pictures ...

Phragmites INVASIVE! Phragmites

Phragmites is a widespread and highly aggressive invasive species. It is spread nearly globally in freshwater wetlands and found throughout the entire continental United States. It can quickly colonize roadside ditches and sites with disturbed soil and more slowly invades the native wetlands with moist soil and shallow water.

Phragmites is a widespread and highly agressive invasive species

Phragmites is found throughout the entire continental United States
Phragmites is found throughout the entire continental United States

 

Japanese Knotweed INVASIVE! Japanese Knotweed

Japanese Knotweed is an invasive species that was introduced to the US from Asia. It is an extremely tolerant species, which thrives in full shade, high temperatures, high salinity, and draught. It is found near water sources; such as along streams and rivers, in low lying areas, waste places, and utility right-of-ways. It can quickly become an invasive pest in natural areas after spreading from cultivated gardens. It forms thick, dense colonies that completely crowd out any other herbaceous species and is now considered one of the worst invasive exotic plants in the US.

Japanese Knotweed in an extremely tolerant invasive species

Japanese Knotweed
Japanese Knotweed

 

Purple Loosestrife INVASIVE! Purple Loosestrife

Purple Loosestrife is a very hardy perennial plant which can rapidly infest and degrade once healthy wetlands; diminishing their value as wildlife habitat. Wetlands are the most biologically diverse, productive component of our ecosystem. Hundreds of species of plants, birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, fish, and amphibians rely on wetland habitat for their survival.

Purple Loosestrife can rapidly infest and degrade wetlands
Purple Loosestrife

 

Reed Canary Grass INVASIVE! Reed Canary Grass

Reed Canary Grass is a thick, perennial grass that can grow up to six feet high. It is a major threat to natural wetlands, as it can easily out compete most native species. Disturbed areas and roadside ditches are also at risk for infestation. If left untreated, the dense stands of this grass can completely take over an area, eliminating all other species and forming a large monoculture.

Reed Canary Grass is a thick, perennial grass
Reed Canary Grass is a major threat to natural wetlands

Reed Canary Grass if left untreated, can completely take over an area

 

INVASIVE! Swallow-Wort

There are two varieties of invasive Swallow-Wort that are becoming large issues in the US; Black and Pale Swallow-Wort. Swallow-Wort is an aggressive vine that was brought to the US as an ornamental plant. It is nicknames the "dog-strangling vine" due to its ability to chose out desirable species. They can occur in a variety of habitats; from open fields to shaded woods, in either moist or dry soil.

Pale Swallow-Wort
Pale Sallow-Wort
Pale Swallow-Wort
Black Swallow Wort
Black Swallow-Wort
Black Swallow-Wort

 

Cattails are one of the most common nuisance plants Cattails

Cattails have the ability to spread along the edge of a body of water, making entrance to the water difficult or impossible. They grow in thick stands, impeding both view of and access to the water body. Cattails are one of the most common nuisance plants we deal with. Please see our Cattail Management page to view the best options for dealing with cattails.

Cattails spread along the edge of a body of water, making entrance to the water difficult or impossible

Cattails
Cattails are one of the most common nuisance plants we deal with

 

Buckthorn is a shrub introduced to the US in the mid 1800s INVASIVE! Buckthorn

Buckthorn is a shrub introduced to the US from Europe in the mid 1800's, and was a very popular material for use in hedge rows. Without any natural diseases or pests to control its growth in the states, it spread quickly. It outcompetes native plants, forming impenetrable layers of vegetation. It blocks sunlight from reaching the forest floor, inhibiting the growth of any new plants. It has little value as food or shelter for wildlife or birds.

Buckthorn spreads quickly and forms impenetrable layers of vegetation

Buckthorn is an invasive shrub
Buckthorn blocks sunlight from reaching the forest floor, inhibiting the growth of new plants

 

Multiflora Rose is an invasive shrub INVASIVE! Multiflora Rose

Multiflora Rose is an invasive shrub growing through most of the eastern United Stated that sometimes also grows in a vine. It's a thorny plant that outcompetes native vegetation and can easily overtake an area. A single multiflora rose bush can produce over a million seeds in a single season, which are dispersed easily by birds.

Multiflora rose is a thorny plant that can easily overtake an area

Multiflora Rose Bush
A single multiflora rose bush can produce over a million seeds in a single season

 

Honeysuckle species: Amur, Japanese, and Morrow's Honeysuckle INVASIVE! Honeysuckle

There are several species of invasive Honeysuckle bushes that you may find in New York; Amur, Japanese, and Morrow's Honeysuckle. The best way to distinguish a native honeysuckle from an invasive honeysuckle is to break open the stem. Native plants will have solid stems, while invasive will be hollow. All three of the invasive varieties have the ability to outcompete native plants and form dense stands; they are also all able to grow in many different types of areas.

Amur Honeysuckle
Morrow's Honeysuckle
Amur Honeysuckle
Morrow's Honeysuckle

Japanese Honeysuckle

Japanese Honeysuckle