Terrestrial Invasive Plant Control


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5681 Zerfass Road
Dansville, New York 14437

Phone: (585) 335-9299
Fax: (585) 335-9301

 

 

 

 

 

Pond and Lake Management
Aquatic Weeds and Invasive Plants

Click on any name for description and additional pictures ...

Eurasian Water Milfoil INVASIVE! Eurasian Water Milfoil

Eurasian Water Milfoil is an invasive plant introduced to the US from Europe and Asia in the 1940's. It begins its growth in the spring earlier than most native plants, allowing it to shade out the native plants and prevent them from growing. Milfoil can easily spread through a water body, forming dense mats of vegetation that make recreation unpleasant or unsafe, if left untreated. There are several other varieties of native milfoil that can can also provide control for.

Eurasian Water Milfoil

Eurasian Water Milfoil
Eurasian Water Milfoil

 

Water Chestnut INVASIVE! Water Chestnut

Water Chestnut is an invasive species introduced to the US from Asia in the 1800's. It poses a serious ecological threat in the Northeast, where it is becoming more widespread. Once introduced to a body of water it can spread very rapidly; forming dense mats that block sunlight from entering the water. In addition it can make boating and swimming impossible. If left untreated, it can drastically reduce oxygen levels and cause fish kills.

Water Chestnut
Water Chestnut

Floating leaves of a single water chestnut plant and the hard "cow-head" chestnut seeds

An untreated infestation of water chestnut

An untreated infestation of water chestnut that has completely taken over a body of water.

Eurasian Water Milfoil INVASIVE! Hydrilla

Hydrilla is an invasive aquatic plant introduced to the US from Asia in the 1950's. Similar to other invasive aquatic plants, it has the ability to grow quickly and form dense mats; blocking sunlight and outcompeting other native vegetation.

Hydrilla

Hydrilla is an invasive aquatic plant
Hydrilla is an invasive aquatic plant

 

Curlyleaf Pondweed INVASIVE! Curlyleaf Pondweed

Curlyleaf Pondweed is a non-native invasive plant introduced into the US from Asia in the mid 1800's. It has since been reported in almost every state in the country. It is extremely tolerant of low light and low temperatures, allowing it to easily establish itself as the dominant plant species in a water body. In addition to forming dense mats of vegetation, it also raises phosphorus levels in the water which leads to increased algae blooms.

Curlyleaf Pondweed forms dense mats of vegetation
Curlyleaf Pondweed forms dense mats of vegetation

 

Duckweed Duckweed

Often referred to as "pond scum," Duckweed is actually many tiny clover like plants that float near the surface of a body of water. Pond weed occurs in still waters and forms a green coating on the water surface as it spreads; if not treated it will often cover the entire water surface.

Duckweed is often referred to as pond scum
Duckweed is often referred to as pond scum

Watermeal is a free-floating plant common in still and stagnant water Watermeal

Watermeal is another plant, like duckweed, that is commonly referred to as pond scum. It is also a free-floating plant common in still and stagnant water, but is much smaller than duckweed. Watermeal germinates all year round, and can easily cover an entire pond. Duckweed and watermeal are often found growing together on the same waterbody.

Watermeal germinates all year round and can easily cover an entire pond
Watermeal germinates all year round and can easily cover an entire pond

 

Water Lilies Water Lilies

Water Lilies are often planted purposely for aesthetic reasons in ponds and lakes; many varieties feature large, colorful flowers when in bloom. As lilies spread they can become problematic in a body of water, with the issues eventually outweighing the aesthetic benefits. Water lilies have sturdy pads and coarse root systems, which can make boating through thick mats of lilies nearly impossible and swimming very unsafe.

Water lilies can make boating and swimming unsafe

Water lilies have sturdy pads and coarse root systems
Water lilies have sturdy pads and coarse root systems